Posts Tagged ‘US exports’

PIERS has Been Chosen by AmSpec to Deliver a Customized Business Intelligence Solution for Bulk Chemical and Petroleum Shipments

October 31, 2013

PIERS has been selected by AmSpec, to deliver a customized business intelligence solution that will provide immediate and actionable insight into bulk shipments of petroleum products around the world.

US Bulk Export Shipments

Recent investments made to the technology PIERS uses to process over 17,000,000 waterborne import and export bills of lading each year, has resulted in new, enhanced data visualization and drill down capabilities that allow PIERS to deliver business intelligence solutions that isolate commodities based on brand names and grades specific to each individual customers’ requirements.

“Over the past couple of years PIERS has undergone a transformation away from being simply a data provider, towards delivering customer-specific solutions that provide immediate, decision-ready intelligence,” said Wael Jarous, Senior Vice President at PIERS. “We fully understand the importance of providing valuable and reliable intelligence to the energy sector and we are pleased to be the single source that can deliver the complete picture. Only with a comprehensive assessment of the U.S. energy market, can calculated risks be taken and strategic decisions executed.”

“As we continue to grow our business by offering our industry-leading services in new markets, it’s important that our strategic planning is based on smart, data-driven decisions,” said Simon Wright, Vice President, International Development, AmSpec. “The business intelligence tools created by PIERS allows us to identify trends in the petroleum industry based on the companies and specific commodities being shipped around the world and apply that knowledge to our decision making.”

PIERS collects over 17,000,000 waterborne import and export bills of lading filed with U.S. Customs (including 4,000,000 export bills of lading) and processes them through their proprietary Six-Step Process. While other data providers have begun publishing a subset of only containerized U.S. exports, PIERS remains the only provider with complete export transactions for all waterborne shipments (including bulk shipments) going back to 1977. Their unique infrastructure, which includes onsite security cleared staff at major U.S. ports allows them to scan and process bills of lading not filed electronically.

For more information about customized solutions from PIERS visit www.piers.com.

Whitepaper from PIERS and InformEx Provides New Insight into U.S. Chemical Export Trends

October 29, 2013

PIERS has partnered with InformEx, the premier global chemical marketplace, to launch a new report that examines top markets for U.S. chemical exports based on the volume of waterborne shipments between 2007 and 2012.

Market Opportunities for U.S. Chemical Exports: An Examination of Growth Across Major Markets, looks at the top geographic markets for exports classified under the U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule’s chapters 28 and 29, which include various organic and inorganic chemicals, as well as certain precious and rare-earth metals. The report provides a macro-assessment of selected commodities that have shown significant growth in the five years leading to 2012 and are traded in relatively high volume. Findings provide valuable high-level market data to chemical manufacturers, distributors, end users, and those servicing the chemical supply chain.

“The global chemical market is in a constant state of change, and companies who are involved in the chemical supply chain need to be acutely aware of the issues affecting demand for their materials,” said Nancy Largay, InformEx brand director. “By combining the InformEx platform with the unrivaled U.S. trade intelligence of PIERS, we’re providing business knowledge that can drive decision-making for the top players in the chemical industry.”

Here are some of the report’s key findings for U.S. exports during the period between 2007 and 2012:

  • Nucleic acids (HS Code 2934) to Brazil grew 405%
  • Halogenated derivatives of hydrocarbons (HS Code 2903) to China grew 246%
  • Titanium oxides (HS Code 2823) to India grew 513.9%
  • Amine-function compounds (HS Code 2921) to South Korea grew 368%
  • Cyclic hydrocarbons (HS Code 2902) to Belgium grew 114.6%
  • Carboxylic acids (HS Code 2918) to the Netherlands grew 334.6%

“For over 35 years, PIERS has been a trusted provider of valuable intelligence to the chemical industry,” said Wael Jarous, Senior Vice President of PIERS – JOC Group Inc. “Many of the biggest names in this sector are investing in our solutions based on our commitment to deliver reliable, decision-ready intelligence. We accomplish this by marrying our client’s business knowledge with our expertise in data processing and optimization; the end result is a powerful customized solution that empowers and supports strategic decision making. InformEx provides us with a great forum to develop these partnerships even further, and for that reason I’m pleased to continue our close relationship.”

Download your complimentary copy of “Market Opportunities for U.S. Chemical Exports: An Examination of Growth Across Major Markets,” for intelligence on what markets and commodities are growing fastest for U.S. chemical exports.

JOC Insights by Mario Moreno: U.S. Exports of Scrap Plastics, Paper & Metals to China

September 25, 2013

U.S. exports of scrap paper, plastics, and metals to China have increased at a remarkable pace over the last 16 years. Between 1996 and 2012, the dollar value of U.S. scrap exports to China in real terms increased at a compound annual growth rate of 24%, allowing China to take 47% of the market in 2012, up from 6% in 1996. Over that same period, U.S. scrap exports to all other markets increased by just 5% a year.

US Scrap Exports to China

Given weak global economic conditions, China’s demand for raw materials declined last year resulting in lower imports of U.S. scrap. In mid February, the “Green Fence” policy was launched with the objective to drastically increase the inspections of containers carrying scrap products to screen off adulterated products and improve China’s environment. Shipping executives began to notice the policy’s impact over trade volumes soon after its implementation. But, what was the monetary impact of the policy over the U.S. – to – China scrap export trade in the months following the policy’s launch?

SEVERE IMPACT ON U.S. SCRAP PLASTIC EXPORTS TO CHINA

U.S. exports of scrap materials to China have been struggling for over a year on weak global demand. But, it appears the Green Fence policy exacerbated the export problems. Before the policy’s implementation in mid February, U.S. exports of scrap plastics to China in nominal value were expected to decline in March by 14.4% y-o-y and amount to $40.4 million, but the value of exports actually declined 31% y-o-y and totaled $32.6 million. April was no better. The expectation for April was a drop of 12% Y-o-Y but the value of exports actually tumbled 39.7%. The expectation for May was a drop of 6.8% y-o-y but the contraction was more severe, down 26.3%.

US Scrap Plastic Exports to China

MODEST IMPACT ON U.S. SCRAP PAPER EXPORTS TO CHINA

The policy’s impact over U.S. scrap paper exports appears to be less severe. Before the policy’s implementation in mid February, U.S. exports of scrap paper to China in nominal value were expected to decline in March by 10.6% y-o-y and amount to $175.5 million, but the value of exports actually declined 14.3% y-o-y and totaled $168.2 million. The expectation for April was a drop of 2.9% y-o-y but the value of exports actually declined by only 1.6%. The expectation for May was a drop of 5.9% y-o-y but the value of exports actually declined by 8.6%.

US Scrap Paper Exports to China

SEVERE IMPACT ON U.S. SCRAP METALS EXPORTS TO CHINA

Before the policy’s implementation in mid February, U.S. exports of scrap metals to China in nominal value were expected to decline in March by 6.7% y-o-y and amount to $635.7 million, but the value of exports actually tumbled 22.9% y-o-y and totaled $525.3 million. The expectation for April was an increase of 5.4% y-o-y but the value of exports actually tumbled by 22.5%. The expectation for May was an increase of 19.2% y-o-y but the value of exports actually declined by 5.9%.

US Scrap Metal Exports to China

More of Moreno’s trade and economic analysis can be obtained by subscribing to JOC Insights or by following him on Twitter @MarioMoreno_JoC.

Top U.S. Imports & Exports with South America

August 1, 2013

Bananas were the top containerized import commodity from South America in April 2013, but it is down 8% over April 2012 and down 5% year to date. The top 10 commodities shown above accounted for 49% of the total box import trade from South America.

Top US Imports from South America

Paper & paperboard was the top containerized export commodity to South America in April 2013. The top 10 commodities shown above accounted for 36% of the total export trade to South America.

Top US Exports to South America in TEUs

For more information about how PIERS Trade Intelligence can help you track U.S. imports & exports for any commodity or region visit www.piers.com or for more trade and economic analysis subscribe to JOC Insights.

March U.S. Containerized Exports Highest in a Year

July 10, 2013

U.S. containerized exports slipped 0.8% in March 2013 year-over-year, totaling 1,072,190 20-foot-equivalent units, according to PIERS data. However, this is the highest monthly volume since March 2012 when exports totaled 1,080,341 TEUs. March containerized exports were up 6% from February through March exports edged up 1.2% from the year-earlier period.

U.S. containerized exports to Asia in March fell 2.3% year-over-year, however year-to-date through March, the trade to Asia was up 0.7%. The trade is forecast to grow 3.9% in 2013 and 3.8% in 2014.

U.S. Containerized Exports March 2013

Of March’s top 25 containerized export commodities, the highest year-over-year declines were in scrap metals, down 22%; plastic products, down 14%; unclassifiable chemicals, down 12%; and vinyl alcohol resins, down 11%. The largest export increases were in edible nuts, which increased 39%; soybeans, up 28%; and motor vehicles, up 16%.

Among March’s top 25 destination countries, shipments to Germany fell the most, down 12% year-over-year to 23,616 TEUs. Volume to Italy declined 11% to 10,879 TEUs, while the Philippines followed with a loss of 9% to 10,702 TEUs. The country with the steepest increase in exports from the U.S. in March was Vietnam — shipments rose 30% to 19,485 TEUs. Shipments to Indonesia totaled 21,873 TEUs in the month, up 24% year-over-year. Exports to the United Arab Emirates climbed 21% to 22,420 TEUs.

Thanks to our unique data operations infrastructure, which includes onsite port staff who have the ability to manually scan every export Bill of Lading (including those not filed electronically), PIERS can proudly say we are the only source for complete U.S. export transactions. To learn more about how you can benefit from PIERS export data register to receive a free demo.

U.S. Containerized Exports Jump 5% in February

June 5, 2013

U.S. containerized exports were up 5% in February 2013 compared to February 2012, reaching 1,011,874 20-foot-equivalent units, according to PIERS data. This is the largest year-over-year increase since June 2012 when exports jumped 9.6%. Exports also increased 4.7% in February versus January. In the first two months of 2013, export volume is up 2.3% from the same period in 2012.

US Containerized Exports February 2013

Of February’s top 25 commodities, those that saw the highest Y-o-Y increases were edible nuts, jumping 75% versus February 2012; soybeans, up 62%; metal scrap, up 36%; and fabrics, up 29%. Animal feed and orange exports were flat in the month. The largest decline of the 25 was miscellaneous machinery, which was down 10%.

Among February’s top 25 destination countries, shipments to Vietnam jumped the most, by 53% Y-o-Y to 22,025 TEUs. Volume to Turkey advanced by 51% to 16,894 TEUs, while Russia followed with a gain of 16% to 10,027. The country with the steepest decline in exports from the U.S. in February was Saudi Arabia — shipments fell 8% to 10,936 TEUs. Shipments to Germany totaled 21,600 TEUs in the month, down 7% year-over-year. Exports to Japan dipped 5% to 67,837 TEUs.

For more information about how PIERS Trade Intelligence can help you track U.S. imports & exports for any commodity or region visit www.piers.com.

JOC Insights by Mario Moreno: Meat Exports Decelerate in 2012

May 28, 2013

U.S. containerized exports of meat (HS code 02) rose 3.2% in 2012, following a jump of 21.7% in the prior year. The index shows that exports more than doubled from 2004 to 2011. Between 2007 and 2012, exports grew at a compound annual growth rate of 10%. Index is up by 140% from 2004 January base.

US Meat Exports in TEUs

PORT OF SAVANNAH HELD LARGEST SHARE OF MEAT EXPORTS IN 2012
The Port of Savannah handled the most outbound shipments of meat in 2012, accounting for a 20% of all meat exports, unchanged from 2011. Th e largest recipients of U.S. meat shipped from the port of Savannah last year were China, Angola, Hong Kong, Georgia, and Taiwan. Port of Oakland follows Savannah with a 16% share. Los Angeles holds a 12% share while Houston and Norfolk each hold a 7% share. The share of each port is unchanged from 2011. These 5 ports account for 63% of all U.S. meat outbound shipments.

US Meat Exports

CHINA RAPIDLY GAINING SHARE OF U.S. MEAT EXPORTS
Japan and Mexico are 2 of the largest markets for U.S. meat exports by $ value. Japan held an 18.9% market share in 2012, up slightly by 0.2 percentage points over 2011, but still down by a 0.2 point from 2010. Mexico accounted for a respectable 17.2% market share last year, but its share is down by almost 2 full points. Meat exports to Japan and Mexico have grown modestly last year. Meat exports to Russia and China increased by 27% each last year. Russia used to be a top market up until 2009, but due to import limitations and the country building toward self-sufficiency in its meat sector, Russia is not a top market anymore. China’s share of exports is rapidly increasing, from 2.6% in 2010 to 6.2% in 2012. Exports to that market jumped 157% in 2011 but slowed the pace to 23% in 2012. Demand for meat will stay strong as long as the incomes on millions in China continue rising.

Losses in market share were seen in Taiwan and Vietnam. Taiwan holds a share of 2.1%, down from 3.1% in 2010, while Vietnam holds a share of 1.4%, down from 2.1% in 2010.

Chart 3

Source: International Trade Commission; author’s own calculations

More of Moreno’s trade and economic analysis can be obtained by subscribing to JOC Insights or by following him on Twitter @MarioMoreno_JoC.

Top U.S. Imports & Exports with Europe

May 14, 2013

‘Auto parts’ was the top containerized import commodity from Europe in February 2013, up 14% over February 2012. The top 10 commodities shown above accounted for 36% of the total box import trade from Europe.

Top U.S. Containerized Imports from Europe

‘Paper & paperboard’ was the top containerized export commodity to Europe in January 2012. A sharp increase was seen PVC resins shipments, up 179% Y-o-Y. The top 10 commodities shown above accounted for 42% of the total export trade to Europe.

Top US Exports to Europe

For more information about how PIERS Trade Intelligence can help you track U.S. imports & exports for any commodity or region visit www.piers.com or for more trade and economic analysis subscribe to JOC Insights.

Economists Cautiously Optimistic Over U.S. Import & Export Growth Forecast

April 16, 2013

Are we seeing enough economic recovery this spring to support growth in volumes of U.S. containerized imports and exports? Economists are seeing some hope, especially in the U.S., but the spring is still looking pretty chilly on a global scale. In the U.S., housing starts and employment are up, but much of southern Europe is mired in recession and growth in emerging Asian markets is slowing.

On the whole, a global recovery is under way, but there are plenty of risks that could cause growth to sputter, especially if it encounters another “black swan” event in the form of an unpredictable catastrophe such as the tsunami and nuclear disaster that struck Japan in 2011.

Any recovery in Europe could be upset by eruption of a fiscal crisis in southern Europe. “Optimism has started to take hold in recent months, but the economic hangover is still very much with us,” said Nick Kounis, head of macroeconomic research for ABN Amro Bank. Yet trade volumes are likely to get stronger this year and even stronger by the second half of 2014 when the global recovery takes hold. Global trade volume, which increased 3% in 2012, is likely to grow 3.3% this year and 3.9% in 2014, Kounis said.

US Containerized Exports

Source: PIERS/JOC Container Shipping Outlook, March 2013

But persistent global economic clouds are causing some economists to cut their forecast of U.S. trade growth. In March PIERS/The Journal of Commerce, economist Mario Moreno reduced his forecast for the growth of U.S. containerized exports this year to 2%, to a total of 12.1 million TEUs, compared with his previous forecast of 4.1%, “in light of the fourth quarter’s weak performance, the general deceleration of volume growth during 2012, and less optimistic economic forecasts across the globe.”

Moreno also cut his forecast for 2014 export growth to 3.4% from the 4.4% rate he estimated in December. “While fiscal uncertainty in the U.S. has been largely contained, in Europe, questions remain on how solid the commitment to austerity is, especially in Italy, where anti-austerity candidates made progress in the last election,” he said. “Such an outcome makes already nervous investors less willing to commit capital to projects and could delay the economic recovery across the European continent.”

Us Containerized Imports

Source: PIERS/JOC Container Shipping Outlook, March 2013

Moreno expects import volumes to grow 2.6% in 2013 to a total of 17.6 million TEUs, compared with just 1.5% in 2012. But he remains cautious in view of the 3.9% dip in total U.S. import volumes in the final quarter of 2012, which capped a disappointing 2012 for U.S. inbound container trade. Annual containerized import traffic expanded just 1.5% during the year, decelerating from the 2.7% pace set in 2011 and a far cry from the 14.5% increase posted in 2010.

He said the 2012 performance was significantly below the two-year moving average of 10.4%, which indicates further sluggishness going forward. Although the fourth quarter 2012 performance can be partially attributed to Hurricane Sandy and labor disputes at U.S. ports, he said the slowdown was primarily due to worsening U.S. economic conditions, particularly fiscal uncertainty and its impact on private investment, which was keeping a tight lid on containerized import growth. “I do not see these conditions appreciably improving during 2013 and am therefore compelled to lower our projection to 2.6% growth,” Moreno said.

For more information about PIERS trade intelligence visit www.piers.com or to learn more about The Journal of Commerce’s Container Shipping Outlook visit www.joc.com.

JOC Insights by Mario Moreno: Furniture Exports Expand

March 26, 2013

U.S. exports of furniture rose for the 18th straight month through November on a year-over-year basis as demand from major markets continued and the U.S. dollar remained competitive. Exports advanced 8.1% year-over-year in November 2012 over November 2011 and totaled $879.6 million (deflated to January 2009 prices) in the month. Through November, exports were up by 12% and totaled $9.5 billion.

U.S. Furniture Exports 2010-2012

Canada is by far the largest market for U.S. furniture (H.S. code 94) exports, accounting for a 51.5% share in 2012 through November, up 0.3% from 2010. Exports to that market year-to-date were up 10 percent, a similar growth seen in 2011.Mexico is the second-largest market, accounting for a 51.5% share year-to-date, up notoriously by nearly 3 percentage points from 2010. Exports to that market were up 27% year-to-date, higher than the 20% growth seen in 2011. Other markets gaining share in the last three years were Germany, Australia and Venezuela.

The fifth-largest market, China, has seen its market share marginally decline in recent years as the economy decelerated but has maintained a double-digit growth demand for U.S. furniture. Wealthy Chinese believe in the quality and design of U.S.-made products, which explains why some U.S. furniture companies are strengthening business relationships in China. Ethan Allen’s CEO said in a recent WSJ interview that the company’s partner Markhor Furniture in China will increase the number of stores that carry Ethan Allen products to at least 100 within a year, up from 77. Demand from the United Kingdom has strengthened markedly in 2012 but not enough to gain market share.

More of Moreno’s trade and economic analysis can be obtained by subscribing to JOC Insights or by following him on Twitter @MarioMoreno_JoC.

PIERS is the only source for transaction-level U.S. export data. To learn more about PIERS export data, visit www.piers.com/USExports.


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